Theme 15: Presentation of Case Studies -
  Best Practices and Experiences of ICT Application for Development
  Number of abstracts currently posted to this Theme: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12
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  (Last updated: November 23rd, 2005)
 
 
 
 
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  Engineers Without Borders and the Philippines Department of Social Welfare and Development Computer Livelihood Training Project  
  Sarah Grant, Project Coordinator  
  Engineers Without Borders, Manila, Philippines  
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  The Computer Livelihood Training Project creates positive change in the lives of Filipino youth, empowers our partner and develops communities. Together, Engineers Without Borders and the Philippines Department of Social Welfare and Development implement Computer Livelihood Training Centers to provide opportunities for underprivileged youth. Three characteristics make this project innovative: quality impact, sustainability, and successful capacity transfer.  
     
  In the last three years, Computer Livelihood Training Centers have been implemented in 15 different communities to train 1,500 youth per year. Results from our first 866 graduates show that 24% of youth find employment or return to school immediately after graduation. Those who do not still benefit from life skills education, increased self-confidence and new social networks.  
     
  Because the project is low-cost – leveraging Canadian equipment donations and over 100 volunteers, each center has an operating cost of USD $200, which is very affordable for our local partner. Ownership is encouraged through networking with local organizations and involving the youth in center design.  
     
  Capacity transfer has been a focus of the project throughout the past three years. The first phase demonstrated the viability of a Computer Livelihood Training Center to improve the lives of Filipino youth. In the second phase, the project expanded while developing the capacity of our local partner. The final phase focuses on building the capacity of our partner at the national level to minimize foreign assistance. Through Computer Livelihood Training, this innovative project is driving extraordinary and sustainable change in the Philippines.  
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  From Northern Village to Global Village: Lessons in E-Health and E-Education from the Arctic  
  Heather E. Hudson, Professor & Director, Telecommunications Management and Policy Program  
  School of Business and Management, University of San Francisco, California, USA  
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  This paper provides a case study of experiences using ICTs for e-health and e-education among indigenous people in the remote North, specifically in Alaska and northern Canada. Alaska has been a pioneer in eliminating distance barriers through telecommunications. Alaska was the first remote region to use satellites to provide reliable communications to its isolated villages. An Alaskan telemedicine initiative called AFHCAN now provides telehealth services to more than 240 locations, two-thirds of which are village clinics staffed by community health aides. All Alaskan village schools are connected to the Internet, most with broadband access by satellite. In northern Canada, native communications organizations are using ICTs to enable village youth to complete high school courses at a distance, rather than leaving the community to attend urban boarding schools. They are also using ICTs to produce indigenous cultural content and record material in native languages, which is available through websites, teleconferences, and audio- and video-streaming over the Internet. This paper draws lessons from the Alaskan and northern Canadian experience in applying telecommunications for delivery of services to remote villages. It presents examples of applications of rural telecommunications for telemedicine, education, government services and business. It also examines policies in providing targeted subsidies and other incentives that have facilitated these initiatives, and which are relevant for other developing regions.  
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  Information Communication Technologies for Development and Knowledge Sharing  
  David J. Grimshaw, International Team Leader, New Technologies  
     
  Surmaya Talyarkhan, Knowledge Sharing Adviser (former)  
     
  Intermediate Technology Development Group (ITDG)  
  The Schumacher Centre for Technology and Development  
  Warwickshire, United Kingdom  
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  This paper builds on the findings of a two-year research project conducted by ITDG and Cranfield University into the use of information communication technologies (ICTs) for development. The research was managed as a Knowledge Transfer Partnership, funded in part by the Department of Trade and Industry in the UK.  
     
  The research aimed to answer the question “what is best practice in connecting the first mile?” through an analysis of the literature and a case study based on practical experience of an ICT for development project in Cajamarca, Peru. The main outcome of the work was a best practice framework (Talyarkhan et al 2005). The paper presented here builds on that best practice framework by suggesting a best practice model for using ICTs in development more generally than the first mile and by utilizing a best practice framework for realizing the value of knowledge (Grimshaw et al 2000).  
     
  The literature to date has generally focussed on developing best practice models from evidence in particular sectors, for example youth or the first mile. This paper synthesises these models and suggests a way of looking at the success factors for ICT and development projects, which is based on a process approach. The process approaches to ICT for development projects are examined in a framework of four dimensions: best practice, pilot studies, research, and integration (Grimshaw 2005).  
     
  The overall contribution of the paper is to suggest an integrated strategy based on starting with the development strategy and considering both an information and technology strategy before embarking on ICT4D.  
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  A Replicable and Low-cost ICT Capacity Building and Support Model (eRiding Experience from Selected Successful Cases Around the Globe)  
  Toni Eliasz, Executive Director  
  Ungana-Africa, Pretoria, South Africa  
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  - provides an introduction into a low-cost ICT capacity building and support model (eRiding),
- highlights some of the successful global cases (such as a project focusing on community radio sector as well as a project with FLOSS emphasis), and
- explains necessary high-level steps how initiatives are able to replicate the model in any parts of the world.
 
     
  eRiding is a low-cost ICT capacity building and support model for development networks or groups of small organisations which share a sector focus (e.g. telecentres), geographical scope (e.g. community based organisations), or managing/funding body. As a world-wide movement with growing representation of more than 20 countries eRiders are one of the largest global resources of ICT capacity building for development organisations. For more information regarding the global eRiders network see www.eriders.net.  
     
  Ungana-Afrika's is helping to incubate, implement, and evaluate the activities of development community technology programs (that are building the capacity of development networks and organisations). These programs empower development organisations to better integrate ICTs as a strategic, mission focused, tool. Ungana-Afrika is developing a set of toolkits and process methodologies published under public domain as well as provides value-added services like training, workshops, project design, and impact measurement. One of the main objectives of Ungana-Afrika is an active international eRider network in the future. Ungana-Afrika is a member of APC.  
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  E-Learning Challenges and Prospects in the Middle East  
  Sameen Ahmed Khan, Lecturer in Mathematics and Physics  
  Middle East College of Information Technology (MECIT), Muscat, Sultanate of Oman  
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  Advances in information and communication technologies (ICT), coupled with changes in society are creating new paradigms for education and training. These massive changes have tremendous impact on education and training systems. The increasing rate of technological changes in networking has opened up a new era in distance education. The education sector in the Middle East has now reached a level, where it has to invest more in information technology solutions to be able to cater to the needs of the growing population. For an effective E-Learning experience in the region, the status of the ICT needs to be analyzed in depth. We examine the key factors including the Internet Utilization and the Internet Infrastructure in the Middle East. The scenario in the Middle East is compared to the Internet trends in other parts of the world.  
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  Application of an Expert System for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) in Libya: A Case Study  
     
  Abdul-Rahman Ali Almgadmi, Engineering Faculty  
     
  Omar S. Abufayed, Engineering Faculty  
     
  S. P. Bindra, Engineering Faculty  
     
  Al-Khomas University, Garaboli Branch, Garaboli, Libya  
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  As per recent estimates the energy needs of the world may be increase by a factor of 3.5% in the coming 50 years. The present oil reserves are sufficient for 35 ˆ 40 years, if there is no increase in the consumption. The oil recovery by primary and secondary production seldom exceeds 30% on the average, the remaining oil can be recovered by use of costly Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) method which is a subset of Improved Oil Recovery (IOR). When the oil prices are low, there is very little incentive to invest in research and field testing for developing such methods for a given reservoir. Existing semi commercial EOR project are terminated leading to a difficult situation when the oil reserves deplete faster than their replacement through (IOR) and (EOR). Considering that and when a field is close to the economic limit, the oil companies should have a clear and well developed program for testing and developing (EOR) method using expert systems in a time frame consistent with the future oil production rates and expected depletion of reserves.  
     
  The paper is designed to present an outline of an Expert System in Libya with a view to resolve the complex problem of depleting oil reserves. A case study is presented to highlight role of information and communication technology (ICT) in Libyan situation to get the better value of investment in EOR projects.  
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  An Analysis of ICT and Capacity Building Among Junior Workers in Selected Nigerian Universities:  
  A Case Study of the University of Ibadan  
     
  Kester Kehinde Oluwaseun, Lecturer  
  Adult Education Department  
     
  Olojede Adeshina Abideen, Doctoral Candidate  
  Adult Education Department  
     
  University of Ibadan, Nigeria  
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  This study will examine the correlational relationship between ICT and the various capacity building programmes put in place by the University of Ibadan.  
     
  Authority and funded by various International Donor Agencies for the different categories of Junior Workers within the University system. This study being a correlational research will adopt the use of expo-facto research design and will make use of purposevely selected sample size of the different category of junior workers in proportionate size. A four point scale structued questionnaire will be used as the major instrument for the purpose of data collection for this study.  
     
  The inferential statistics of F-ratio and chi-square would be used to test the research hypotheses that would be stated for the purpose of this study at 0.05 alpha level.  
     
  In line with the above background, this study will therefore attempt to discuss the trend and pattern of the development, acquisition and utilisation of ICT among the low level manpower (junior workers) in Nigerian Universities in general and the University of Ibadan in particular.  
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  Internet Radio: a new challenge for discovering cultural heritage of Europe            
  (Case Study: Heritage Radio Network)  
     
  Panayiotis Petropoulos  
  University of Luebeck, Germany - International School of New Media, ISNM  
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  The purpose of this thesis is to examine the potentiality of a new multimedia called Internet Radio.  
     
  As case study shall be taken the HERMES project with the aim to promote and to protect cultural heritage through use of new multi media.  By having set up an Internet Radio, and contents coming from editors and journalists of the different radio stations in this new network, attention is drawn to the diverse cultural heritages, activities and events in Europe. From an evaluative viewpoint the HERMES project examines as well how cultural heritage can be considered as factor of regional development, while in terms of the European dimension the question exists whether the assumption holds true that cultural heritages in Europe are the sources for one common cultural identity linked with European citizenship. Since an Internet Radio aims to make this become conscious to everyone, that then can be considered as the beginning of a new media policy within digital culture. According to Pierre Deason, the first coordinator of Heritage Radio Network, the editorial policy can be viewed as an attempt to open windows so that people can look across borders to see what other cultural heritages exist on the other side. Of interest will be, therefore, whether use of such digital media can give access to cultural heritages in Europe.  
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  ICT4D Stakeholder Co-ordination and Co-operation: Evicences from a Tanzanian-German Co-operation  
     
  Fernanda Scur  
  MSC in Digital Media, International School of New Media, Porto Alegre, Brazil  
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  This paper consists of an analysis on the influence of perception, communication and content in coordination and collaboration among stakeholders of digital information and communication technologies for development aid projects. The subject of the research conducted is the “Connect and Learn” project, which belongs to a Tanzanian-German co-operation on the health sector.  The researcher spent two months in field, where a combination of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) were applied in data gathering, in an attempt to achieve greater analysis accuracy of stakeholders behaviour and at the same time the representativeness required in such scientific study.  
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  Who is "developed" and who is not? When "outsourcing" happens from "third" to "first" world contexts  
     
  Radhika Gajjala, Associate Professor, Interpersonal Communication/Communication Studies  
  Bowling Green State University  
     
  Annapurna Mamidipudi, Founding Trustee  
  Dastkar Andhra, Hyderabad, India  
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  In this paper, the two co-authors draw from a classroom based experiment/exercise on outsourcing web-design work from a “third-world” rural based location to a “first-world” university location. Students in a Midwestern U.S. university class on computers and community were given an assignment that required them to experience being offshore web-designers for a handloom weaver located in rural South India. One of the instructors is a faculty member at a university in the Midwestern University in USA and the other is an NGO worker with direct access to the rural handloom weavers and their communities. This exercise produced insights regarding the practical process of offshore work and the kinds of cross-cultural, cross-context dialogue and negotiations that are necessary. It is important to note that the U.S. Midwestern University is located amidst farmlands and is surrounded by U.S. rural areas which are extremely different in terms of everyday practices in comparison to rural areas/communities in South India. Further, most of the students who participated in the exercise did not know anything about computer programming or website construction prior to taking this course even though they were avid world-wide-web consumers like most North American college student populations. In this setting as we examine the data we gathered from doing this cross-context collaboration, the co-authors of this article are compelled to ask questions regarding “development” in relation to ICTs and offshore work. Various issues and insights emerge, which raise important questions concerning taken for granted assumptions about the information society and globalization.  
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  An Open Source Ecosystem to Address the Digital Divide Issue: A Malaysian Experience  
     
  Raja Noor Ainin Raja Zainal, Leader, Pervasive Computing Team, MIMOS  
  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia  
     
  Sabariah Mohd Zin, Manager, OSS Programme, MIMOS  
  Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia  
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Digital Divide is as much an issue in the urban areas as in the rural areas. Various factors identified include lack of infrastructure, poor literacy, limited content and poverty. An Open source Ecosystem may not be able to address all these factors but it definitely helps in resolving some of the main problems related to these factors. Believing in this, MIMOS has conducted some Open Source-based projects. It is hoped that these efforts contribute to an Open source Ecosystem that is favourable to all walks of life in Malaysia. We put forward here the experiences that are gained from these initiatives.

 
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  The Importance of the Rational Organization in the Internet Portals  
     
  Gayane Margaryan, Author, Medical Portal (www.doctor.am)  
  Yerevan, Armenia  
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Answering to the global challenges such as: terrorism, poverty, epidemics depends on effective system of social relations. Internet is one such domain of social bonds and ties. Internet portals take special place in the virtual space, being information and communication hubs, offering wide range of services to its visitors. Let's look at the creation of data bank which aggregate all the objects into one set allowing to classify and search for different object complexes it contains:

 
  • people, • administrative-local units, • buildings, • services, • legal acts, laws, • various info, • goods, techs.  
     
  At this point it becomes urgent to connect many of the institutions and local-administrative units to the internet with a high-speed infrastructure such as fiber-optic. Only major backbone connections are set-up between regions of Armenia. Still lot of work needs to be done in this direction.  
     
  Another important task which can be solved by rational organized Internet portal is to provide regional skilled work-force with up-to-date information, trainings and opportunities for social life. This will ease flow of skilled specialists towards regions, which stands in accordance with horizontal hierarchy principle, whereas vertical hierarchy is destructive for a state because the top of hierarchy has only limited powers.  
     
  Creation of effective portal system includes intercommunication and collaboration between state and private sectors, with international partners in order to build necessary infrastructure and to strengthen IT aiming at health care, providing medical services and education, information exchange between health care professionals.  
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